Eating Disorders Videos

Navigating Triggers at the Gym

Navigating Triggers at the Gym | Libero Magazine
Being triggered in the gym is pretty much a guarantee. Once in the state of stable recovery, exercise can be reintroduced, but it can be scary because of the multitude of triggers surrounding any fitness activity.

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For many of us in recovery from an eating disorder, reintroducing exercise and stepping back into a gym can be a recipe of triggers galore; from the calorie tracking machines, the ominous scale lurking in the locker room to the fat talking, body shaming exercise instructors and trainers.

Being triggered in the gym is pretty much a guarantee.

Once in the state of stable recovery, exercise can be reintroduced, but it can be scary because of the multitude of triggers surrounding any fitness activity. Like food, exercise is a part of a healthy lifestyle and is not only important for our physical health but our mental health as well.

So how does one go about navigating these triggers in the gym or fitness facility?

1. Stay mindful and aware of when your ED voice starts to scream at you. Being able to acknowledge that it is ED and not your authentic voice is huge.
2. Ask yourself how choosing harmful thoughts or behaviors will benefit your recovery.
3. Practice being nonreactive to ED thoughts or desires.
4. Revisit the trigger later in a healthy and productive manner through self-reflection or self study (“why did this trigger me?” “Are there other things going on in my life that might have made this trigger really intense?”) Share your experience with your therapist or support network.

Watch here: https://youtu.be/F5PtxtHmpWY

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Robyn is the founder, owner, and operator of Asteya Fitness in Irvine, CA. She believes in health at every size and that the key to health and well being is establishing and nurturing the mind body connection through intuitive eating and exercise. She is a born and raised California girl and the mommy to a crazy spirited boy, Elijah. | Visit her website: www.asteyafitness.com


SITE DISCLAIMER: The opinions and information shared in this article or any other Content on our site may not represent that of Libero Network Society. We hold no liability for any harm that may incur from reading content on our site. Please always consult your own medical professionals before making any changes to your medication, activities, or recovery process. Libero does not provide emergency support. If you are in crisis, please call 1-800-784-2433 or another helpline or 911.