Mental Health

Faith through Struggle

God is Our Greatest Encourager | Libero Magazine 2

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Editor's Note: We are a non-religious magazine. However, we acknowledge that spirituality is important to many. Our Faith column is a place to discuss how faith (of any kind) positively affects mental health and how to improve the conversation around mental health within faith communities.

I have a lot to be thankful for lately. My husband landed a position in his desired career field and we were able to move into a brand new, bigger apartment. I was promoted at work, and my new job is everything I could have hoped for; I wake up excited to go to work every day, which I know is a rare gift, especially while many people are happy to have any employment at all. We are healthy, we can pay our bills, and life is pretty close to perfect at the moment. When life is good, it’s not hard to have faith and thank God, to be genuine in your gratefulness and praise His blessings.

It’s easy to trust Him when you have everything you want. It’s only when things take a turn for the worse that the human part of us struggles with our lost sense of control, uneasy and afraid to blindly place our faith into the unknown of what lies ahead.

I have faced my own share of darkness, the shadows of which have changed many times over throughout my life.

It’s shown itself differently, but what’s never faltered has been my own need to find meaning in everything. When things are bad, I wonder what I’ve done to deserve them, and when things are good—well, I still wonder the same thing.

What I have learned from everything that’s happened to me is this:


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God does have a plan for us and He sees what we need.

This is true even when we don’t see it for ourselves, and even if it’s not what we want at the time. Life hurts and bad things happen, sometimes in a way that makes us question everything we think we believe in—but life is also filled with moments of unimaginable joy and beautiful surprises we can’t begin to anticipate.

One of the hardest things for me and I’m sure for many others, is my ability to rely on God not only in good times, but also when life has handed me more than I think I can handle.

I realize now that even in the darkest of moments when it feels like the storms in our life might swallow us whole, we need to trust Him—completely, without expectations, and with the understanding that salvation may not be immediate, but will be given to us when the time is truly right.

All things, no matter their nature, happen on His timetable, not our own.

I start and end every day thanking God for what’s been given to me.

I hope that the good things will be plentiful, but I know that tomorrow is unknown.

While I do not wish for more struggles (who does?), I know with certainty that should they happen, I will not stand to face them alone. The Lord may work in mysterious ways, but I can rest more easily knowing that He’s never steered me wrong before. He’s got a pretty good track record that way.

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Lindsay Abraham was first diagnosed with anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder when she was twelve years old. Now more than twelve years later, she is passionate about her own recovery journey and supporting others who struggle with mental health issues. She has a job in the healthcare industry that she loves, and spends her free time reading and collecting oddities. She's also active in the pagan community, and currently has 14 tattoos. Lindsay is an avid animal lover, with two pet birds and a dog. She's a vegetarian, and is grateful every day for a husband that loves her unconditionally.

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The opinions and information shared in this article or any other Content on our site may not represent that of Libero Network Society. We hold no liability for any harm that may incur from reading content on our site. Please always consult your own medical professionals before making any changes to your medication, activities, or recovery process. Libero does not provide emergency support. If you are in crisis, please call 1-800-784-2433 or another helpline or 911.