Eating Disorders

Recovery Brings us Together

Recovery Brings us Together | Libero Magazine

Before you start reading...

Please Support our Nonprofit Magazine!

There has never been a time when our community and content was needed more. As a nonprofit online community and magazine, we provide FREE articles, videos, and other content that is available worldwide, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Due to the global pandemic, we’ve had to put events, collaborations and business sponsorships on hold, leaving us to rely exclusively on online donations from our community (aka YOU!) We want to be here to support you all through this pandemic and beyond, which is why we are asking you to consider donating whatever you are able. A single (or monthly) donation of just $5 will make a difference and will help keep our nonprofit running so we can continue supporting you and others.
$
Select Payment Method
Personal Info

Credit Card Info
This is a secure SSL encrypted payment.
Terms

Donation Total: $5 One Time


One thing I find very universal with eating disorders is how poorly they get along with relationships. Ruining existing relationships, or preventing new ones, eating disorders isolate us in so many ways. It replaces relationships with family, friends, and loved ones with one relationship that is all encompassing: the relationship with the eating disorder.

I know that for me, the timing of my eating disorder played a huge role in my lack of friends. I struggled most during the transition into high school and throughout high school, which is when most of my friends were having first dates and girlfriends. Meanwhile, I was at the nutritionist or fighting with my parents about what was for dinner. Did I feel left out? Not really. I didn’t feel at all, all I could focus on was the seemingly imperative task of making sure my dinner, or snack, or whatever was something my eating disorder would approve of.

Romantic relationships aren’t the only ones that suffer at the hands of an eating disorder. My friendships were shallow at best, simply because I was closed off. Having a secret so huge that takes up such a large part of your life makes it hard to connect with people on any level. I think it would’ve been different had I been open about my eating disorder, but at the time that didn’t even seem like an option. Even now, looking back on my decision to not tell my friends, I don’t think I could have had the courage to tell everyone, or the strength to fight the preconceived notions people would have about me once they knew.

I know that being a guy had a lot to do with this stigma and judgement I felt was unavoidable if the truth were out, but I don’t think it would’ve been easy at all had that stigma not existed.

So yes, eating disorders most definitely do isolate sufferers. But what about recovery? I know that I personally haven’t heard much about this, but I have realized, looking back upon my recovery journey, although the eating disorder itself isolates so harshly, the recovery process brings us together in a way few other things can.


Are you enjoying this article? We are a nonprofit and rely on donations to run our magazine and community. If you are enjoying this article, would you consider making a $2 donation?


Give $2 towards this Article

$

Custom Amount

Select Payment Method
Personal Info

Credit Card Info
This is a secure SSL encrypted payment.
Terms

Donation Total: $2 One Time


I have met a lot of wonderful people through my recovery, and I can honestly say that each and every one of them has had a positive impact in my life in one way or another. I think it is something about the shared struggle of recovery that brings people in recovery together. The ability someone has to understand your situation when they have been there for themselves is a very powerful thing.

For me, a lot of the relationships that grew during my recovery were were mostly through blogging. From letting each other know we believe in each other, to celebrating our victories together and laughing together, these friendships had, and continue to have, an extremely positive impact on my life.

In addition to meeting an incredible support group full of people who understand where each other are at, I also got a lot closer to my family. The process of working through recovery with someone requires so much trust and hard work, and realizing that my family was willing to do that for me brought me a lot closer to them.

The important distinction to make is the difference between the wonderfully supportive recovery communities of family or online, and the lack of relationships when entrenched in an eating disorder.

It’s no coincidence that when we fall further into our eating disorder, our relationships fall to the side, and that when we walk further in our journey towards recovery, our relationships grow deeper and more meaningful. I think strong relationships help us progress towards recovery, while at the same time the stronger our recovery the stronger relationships we are able to support.

I know it sounds cliche, but I really do believe that everything happens for a reason, my eating disorder included. The good comes with the bad, and while the eating disorder and isolation is certainly a bad thing, Without having gone through it I wouldn’t have entered into the recovery journey, and wouldn’t have had the opportunity to meet the wonderful people along my journey.


Support our nonprofit by shopping from our NEW Giving Shop!



Click Here to visit the shop!

Scott hopes to turn the negativity of his Anorexia into something positive by supporting other men and women who struggle with eating disorders in any way he can. He also hopes to raise awareness of eating disorders in men in order to get better treatment. His message is simple: recovery is possible, and you can achieve it. Some of his hobbies are coffee, cars, and bicycle racing. He is currently studying mechanical engineering and German.

Subscribe

Become a patron!

Become a Monthly Patron

$ 5

You have chosen to donate $5 monthly.

Select Payment Method
Personal Info

Credit Card Info
This is a secure SSL encrypted payment.
Terms

Donation Total: $5 Monthly

Support our work through our NEW Giving Shop!

libero mental health nonprofit giving shop preview

Do you blog about mental health?

Follow us on Instagram!

Instagram has returned empty data. Please authorize your Instagram account in the plugin settings .
Micaela: Free from Shame | Libero Magazine 1 Send us your story! [click here] or post your “Free from___” photo on Instagram and tag us: @liberomagazine!

SITE DISCLAIMER

The opinions and information shared in this article or any other Content on our site may not represent that of Libero Network Society. We hold no liability for any harm that may incur from reading content on our site. Please always consult your own medical professionals before making any changes to your medication, activities, or recovery process. Libero does not provide emergency support. If you are in crisis, please call 1-800-784-2433 or another helpline or 911.