Eating Disorders

Challenging Yourself and Your Recovery During the Holidays

Challenging Yourself and Your Recovery During the Holidays | Libero Magazine
I challenge you to challenge yourself this holiday season. Use the time spent with friends to also further your eating disorder recovery and build yourself a better future.

Before you start reading...

Please Support our Nonprofit Magazine!

There has never been a time when our community and content was needed more. As a nonprofit online community and magazine, we provide FREE articles, videos, and other content that is available worldwide, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Due to the global pandemic, we’ve had to put events, collaborations and business sponsorships on hold, leaving us to rely exclusively on online donations from our community (aka YOU!) We want to be here to support you all through this pandemic and beyond, which is why we are asking you to consider donating whatever you are able. A single (or monthly) donation of just $5 will make a difference and will help keep our nonprofit running so we can continue supporting you and others.
$
Select Payment Method
Personal Info

Credit Card Info
This is a secure SSL encrypted payment.
Terms

Donation Total: $5 One Time


When in recovery from an eating disorder, the Holidays can be full of fear foods and different foods we may not be used to. At this point, you’ve  made it through Thanksgiving, but there can still be quite a bit of challenging food ahead of you in the holiday season.

There are lots of holiday parties, New Year’s Eve, and so on, so why not make the most of it–challenge yourself and advance your recovery while enjoying your holidays? Before, I have talked about how to focus on family and what matters about the holidays when we encounter challenging foods during the holidays.

This year, however, I would like to focus on taking the holidays as an opportunity to challenge yourselves rather than simply making it through them.

I just wrote on how challenging ourselves with fear foods can be very advantageous in our recovery, so why not take advantage of this during the holidays?

There are plenty of opportunities to try new foods and new situations to try them in. Not only will challenging yourself with fear foods during the holidays help your recovery in the long run, it will also help your holidays by allowing you to socialize at parties without worrying too much about the food. In addition, having loved ones and things to focus on other than food also helps reduce anxiety and makes it easier to overcome your fear foods.

Challenging Yourself During the Holidays | Libero


Are you enjoying this article? We are a nonprofit and rely on donations to run our magazine and community. If you are enjoying this article, would you consider making a $2 donation?


Give $2 towards this Article

$

Custom Amount

Select Payment Method
Personal Info

Credit Card Info
This is a secure SSL encrypted payment.
Terms

Donation Total: $2 One Time


An example from my experience is Christmas breakfast.

My family always has breakfast on Christmas morning, and it is usually something involving eggs and bacon with cinnamon rolls or the like. During recovery, and to this day, my breakfast was typically something along the lines of oatmeal or cereal. A breakfast like the one we usually do for Christmas is quite a bit different than my usual and was a bit of a challenge because of that. It was also challenging because bacon or sausage weren’t foods I was very comfortable with at the time. However, this was a great opportunity to challenge myself and grow in my recovery.

New Year’s Eve can also be quite challenging.

For me, New Year’s Eve is always a lot of party food and snacks. These can be especially hard because they often don’t fit nicely into your meal plan and seem like extra food on top of the meals you are supposed to eat.

Challenging ourselves by eating these foods at parties without reducing our intake at other meals helps greatly in normalizing our relationship with food. And I mean really challenging yourself, not just eating celery from the veggie tray. When we are able to eat chips, cookies, and appetizers like everyone else is and understand it doesn’t need to be taken out of a meal elsewhere, we begin to realize it is okay to have extra to eat sometimes, especially when it allows us to socialize with others.

So I challenge you to challenge yourself this holiday season. Use the time spent with friends to also further your recovery and build yourself a better future.

Tweet this post:


Support our nonprofit by shopping from our NEW Giving Shop!



Click Here to visit the shop!

Scott hopes to turn the negativity of his Anorexia into something positive by supporting other men and women who struggle with eating disorders in any way he can. He also hopes to raise awareness of eating disorders in men in order to get better treatment. His message is simple: recovery is possible, and you can achieve it. Some of his hobbies are coffee, cars, and bicycle racing. He is currently studying mechanical engineering and German.

Subscribe

Become a patron!

Become a Monthly Patron

$ 5

You have chosen to donate $5 monthly.

Select Payment Method
Personal Info

Credit Card Info
This is a secure SSL encrypted payment.
Terms

Donation Total: $5 Monthly

Support our work through our NEW Giving Shop!

libero mental health nonprofit giving shop preview

Do you blog about mental health?

Follow us on Instagram!

Instagram has returned empty data. Please authorize your Instagram account in the plugin settings .
Micaela: Free from Shame | Libero Magazine 1 Send us your story! [click here] or post your “Free from___” photo on Instagram and tag us: @liberomagazine!

SITE DISCLAIMER

The opinions and information shared in this article or any other Content on our site may not represent that of Libero Network Society. We hold no liability for any harm that may incur from reading content on our site. Please always consult your own medical professionals before making any changes to your medication, activities, or recovery process. Libero does not provide emergency support. If you are in crisis, please call 1-800-784-2433 or another helpline or 911.